Biscoff Tiramisu

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For my first recipe post, I knew I wanted to do something completely me – something created from little pieces of my heart. (But not actual, literal pieces of my heart, because that’s gross.)

I decided to combine three of my great loves: coffee, tiramisu, and my main squeeze, the one and only Biscoff cookie. But this recipe also served another, darker purpose: when I take the leftovers to work, they will further my mission to infect the great state of Oklahoma with a love of all things Speculoo.

In Oklahoma there are no Trader Joe’s, and so the cookie butter phenomenon hasn’t quite caught on. Biscoff cookies are relegated to the sad bottom shelves of Wal-Mart Supercenters, where they remain – looking unloved and, in the words of a friend of mine, like “old people cookies.” I want to make one thing very clear: I will not stand for this. 

I knew I wanted to really highlight how perfectly coffee and Biscoff go together, so my already nontraditional tiramisu got a little more out of the box with the addition of instant coffee granules to the cream mixture. Also, because I try to try to make things with accessible ingredients, I used cream cheese in the place of the traditional mascarpone.

Trust me, it’s still delicious. The crunchy cookies take on a soft, dreamy texture and the bitterness from the coffee and cocoa powder make this dessert rich, but not overwhelmingly sweet.

Whip up this dessert in less than twenty minutes with less than ten ingredients, many of which you probably already have in your pantry or fridge. I made it as part of a double-date night menu, but I think it would be a hit anywhere. Serve it to company, bring it to work, take it to your weekly game night, whatever – just spread the word, alright?

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Biscoff Tiramisu
1 package Biscoff cookies
2 blocks cream cheese, room temperature
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp instant coffee granules (I like Nescafe), plus 1 tsp for sprinkling
1-2 tsp cocoa powder (optional)
1 cup strong coffee or espresso, cooled or room temperature

1. In a small mixing bowl, whip the heavy cream (I used a hand mixer, a stand mixer or even some pretty intense elbow grease would work) until stiff peaks form, then set aside.

2. In a large mixing bowl, add the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla, and coffee granules. Whip until creamy and no “grit” from the sugar remains.

3. Working a quarter at a time, use a spatula to gently fold the whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture.

4. In a square serving dish, (I would not use anything larger than 8×8 – you can use a bigger dish, but you would need to pick up a second package of cookies or make do with only a single layer of Biscoff) arrange the Biscoff cookies in a single layer across the bottom. Spoon the coffee over each cookie individually. Repeat this process with a second layer of Biscoff cookies – arranging them in the same pattern as the first, then spooning more coffee over each cookie.

5. Gently pour the cream cheese mixture over the top (but try not to drool). Spread the mixture to evenly cover the cookies.

6. Sprinkle the cocoa powder and coffee granules on top, maybe even crumble some leftover cookies and throw those on if you’re feeling daring.

7. Refrigerate for a minimum of 4 hours, but overnight is best. I understand if you wake up at 2 a.m. and absolutely need to taste test this – I found myself stumbling out of bed this morning and sneaking a few spoonfuls of the leftovers straight out of the fridge. I am working on assembling a support group.

8. Serve right out of the fridge with a cup of hot coffee and make everyone happy.

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Stocking A Feastworthy Kitchen, Part 2 – The Fridge

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As near and dear as bulk bins are to my heart, dry goods are only part of the battle – you also have to have a well-stocked fridge and freezer if you want your kitchen to be as adaptable as you are. Knowing you have supplies on hand to make a lazy Monday night skillet meal or to feed a surprise crowd can make all the difference.

The Fridge
1. Fresh Produce
I would suggest keeping 3-4 different vegetables in the crisper at all times, along with some onions. Vegetables are healthy and (with the right touch) can be delicious and versatile. I usually scour my grocery store produce section for whatever is on sale that week and then plan a few meals around that. Most vegetables will keep around a week or so if stored properly, so as long as you can make a weekly shopping trip you should always have one or two options around. An even better strategy is to focus on fresh produce that doesn’t freeze well. For example, I tend to buy things like spinach, zucchini, tomatoes, okra, and cucumbers fresh.

2. Butter
I know, I know – my love of butter is going to earn me an early grave, but it’s a risk I’m willing to take. If I am given a choice of cooking oil that’s not deep frying or high heat, I will almost always choose butter. Don’t even talk to me about the insanity of using VEGETABLE OIL to make waffles or cookies. I know I just spent an entire paragraph singing the praises of fresh veggies, but here’s some real talk: I used to be a crazy picky eater. I would not have gotten this far in my love affair with the veg had it not been for numerous sides of sauteed squash in butter or adding a pat of the sweet stuff to steamed broccoli over a hundred sad, cringey nights. Side note: I don’t do this anymore. Steamed broccoli is an abomination.

3. Minced Garlic (In A Jar)
Somewhere between the crushed sadness that is garlic powder and actually making an effort, there lies minced garlic in a jar. You can probably get enough of this stuff to last three months for less than $3, which in my opinion is a pretty sound investment given that you should really be adding garlic to, oh, PRETTY MUCH EVERYTHING. Or maybe that’s just me.

4. Parmesan Cheese
While it’s definitely worth the investment to shell out for a block of the good stuff (especially with the rind, which can be added to pasta sauces or soups to add some seriously amazing flavor), but even a canister of the cheap stuff will do in a pinch. If you can’t tell, I have a big thing for roasted vegetables as side dishes, and I almost always add a sprinkle of parmesan cheese on top. Heck, I can’t think of many savory items not made better by parmesan cheese. Veggies, baked chicken, pork chops, bread, pasta, rice, popcorn, potatoes… Sorry, what was I saying?

5. Yogurt
One of my favorite breakfast foods, yogurt’s usefulness extends far beyond the crap (Get it, guys? Get it?) Jamie Lee Curtis tries to sell you. Nary a brunch is served at my house without a pretty parfait, and many Monday mornings begin with me shuffling into the kitchen and pouring some raspberries and vanilla on plain yogurt with my eyes still closed. I would recommend buying the giant tubs of plain yogurt and kicking the flavored habit, since that Boston Cream Pie Yoplait is mostly just sugar (and don’t act like you’re even a little surprised, buddy). Plain yogurt can be a healthier alternative to mayo in salad recipes, replace sour cream on tacos and baked potatoes, and can be made into a great marinade or dipping sauce.

And there you have it: You’re five items closer to having a pretty damn well-stocked kitchen. Next up in the series is my secret weapon for entertaining at the drop of a hat – an overflowing freezer.